How a Change of Career Can Impact Your Self-Directed IRA

The process of building up a retirement nest egg doesn’t occur in a vacuum. You can come up with a savings plan and investment plan, but if the other financial elements of your life undergo significant changes, you might have to adjust those plans. One thing that can impact your self-directed IRA in several important ways is changing your job or career.

New Income Levels

As you are likely already aware, your ability to contribute to a traditional self-directed IRA or a Roth self-directed will depend on your modified adjusted gross income, as well as whether you’re participating in an employer-sponsored retirement plan such as a 401(k).

For 2014, for example, if you’re a single taxpayer and you’re covered by a retirement plan at work, you can only deduct the full amount of any contributions you make to a traditional self-directed IRA if your modified gross income is $60,000 or less. If you’re not covered by a retirement plan at work then your contributions to a traditional self-directed IRA will be fully deductible regardless of your income. With respect to a Roth self-directed IRA it is irrelevant whether or not you participate in an employer-sponsored retirement plan, but you can only make the maximum contribution to your Roth account if your modified adjusted gross income is less than $181,000.

Clearly there are several moving parts here, but the bottom line is that whenever you switch to a new career or job, the optimal contribution strategy you used in past years may not be the best one in your new position. You may find that you’re much better off making contributions to a traditional account than a Roth account, or vice versa. (And some individuals maintain both Roth and traditional IRAs throughout their saving years for just this reason.)

Ability to Rollover Your 401(k) Account

Whenever you change jobs, you have the ability to roll over your account balance to your new 401(k) account at your new employer (assuming that your new employer offers such a plan). That has certainly been a common approach among many individuals who find themselves moving to a new job or new career.

But that change in job or career gives an opportunity to rollover the balance that’s in your 401(k) account into your self-directed IRA. Not only will this give you the opportunity to reduce your administrative burden by having fewer accounts to manage, but you’ll also have a larger pool of capital that you can use to make some of the less common retirement investments that you can only do with a self-directed IRA.

It’s true that you can generally leave your 401(k) account with your old employer, but if you choose that path you won’t be able to make new contributions to your account, and you’ll be stuck with whatever limited investment options that particular plan happens to offer.

Make sure that you structure this as a direct rollover, not as a distribution and contribution of funds. The negative tax implications of taking a distribution from your 401(k) could be significant.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *