Three Employer-Sponsored Retirement Plan Options

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If you want to supply your employees with retirement benefits, you have three major options. You can offer 401(k), SEP IRA or SIMPLE IRA plans. 

Each solution provides different advantages, so it’s wise to learn the details on all three options and carefully compare them before making a choice.

Contributions

The SIMPLE IRA limits total yearly employee deposits to $19,000 or $22,000 after the age of 50. Both 401(k)s and SEP IRAs permit substantially larger contributions. Total deposits are capped at $57,000. Staff members over 50 years old can add more money to their retirement accounts as a “catch up”.

Both 401(k)s and SIMPLE IRAs permit employees to contribute funds whereas SEP IRAs do not provide this option. The employer is fully responsible for funding an SEP program. Companies can deposit amounts equaling as much as one-quarter of workers’ wages in SEP or 401(k) accounts.

Complexity

Both types of IRAs are simpler to establish and maintain than 401(k) plans. This saves time while reducing administrative costs. 

The process of creating an SEP program involves several steps, such as:

  • Producing a legal document.
  • Supplying said document to staff members.
  • Opening separate accounts for individual employees. 

Pre-written, ready-to-use agreements are available.

Qualifications

A company must have no more than 100 staff members to use a SIMPLE IRA. On the other hand, a SEP IRA would be used for sole-proprietors or those with few employees or employees that may be seasonal. The solo 401(k) plan requires an individual to have NO employees in any companies they may own.

Employees must earn a minimum of $5,000 per year in order to enroll in the SIMPLE accounts. The income requirement for SEP IRAs is only $600 and contingencies for eligibility can be made. For example, being over the age of 21 and having worked for the company for at least 3 of the last 5 years.

Similarities

All three options have penalties for people who withdraw money at less than 59.5 years of age. This fee equals one-tenth of the withdrawn amount. Federal taxes are usually deducted from withdrawals, even after a worker reaches retirement age. Nonetheless, employer-sponsored retirement plans are treated favorably by the IRS.

Please contact us to speak with a knowledgeable IRA Specialist to set up accounts or learn more about the above-mentioned options.

We serve clients promptly, offer a wide range of employee retirement solutions and waive many of the fees that competitors charge.

References

https://www.investopedia.com/ask/answers/102714/what-are-main-differences-between-simplified-employee-pension-sep-ira-and-simple-ira.asp

https://twocents.lifehacker.com/the-sep-ira-limit-is-increasing-in-2019-1830310964

https://www.fool.com/investing/what-is-a-sep-ira.aspx

https://www.investopedia.com/ask/answers/10/why-employer-matches-401k.asp

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