2021 Contribution Limits: IRAs and Beyond

Self-Directed IRAs (SDIRAs) are some of the best vehicles when it comes to receiving tax benefits when we use them to invest. Common ways to fund an IRA are by using methods such as rollovers from previous employers or transfers from other IRA accounts, but personal contributions may also be another way to help these accounts grow. 

Although it would be nice to contribute as much as we wanted, every year specific limitations are set by the IRS on how much money individuals can contribute to their IRAs and other tax advantaged retirement accounts. Now that the 2021 contribution limits have been announced, we’ve listed those limits here for you.  

Personal Plans

Traditional and Roth IRAs are both considered personal plans, and often follow similar guidelines on their limits. For 2021, the contribution limits for Traditional and Roth IRAs remained the same as 2020, but some other accounts did see an increase. 

The 2021 contribution limit for Traditional and Roth IRAs is $6,000, with a catch –up contribution of $1,000 ($7,000 total) if you’re age 50 or older. In order to make a contribution to these two accounts, one must have “earned income”. Earned income includes money such as wages, salaries, bonuses, commissions and self-employment income. Disability retirement benefits can also be considered earned income in some cases. 

Anyone can contribute to a Traditional IRA if they have earned income, but in some cases, you may not be able to directly contribute to a Roth IRA if you make too much money. Certain limitations have been placed on Roth IRAs that state if your income exceeds a specific amount, you are ineligible to directly contribute. 

2021 Traditional IRA Deduction Limits
2021 Roth IRA Income Limits

If you find that you do make too much money in 2021 to contribute to a Roth IRA directly, there’s always another option. A “Back Door Roth Conversion” could allow you to fund a Traditional IRA by making a non-deductible contribution and then convert it to a Roth account afterward, allowing you the benefits of a Roth IRA. If you have questions on Roth Conversions, don’t hesitate to contact one of our Certified IRA Specialists.

Remember. You are never required to contribute the maximum amount allowed, but in order to contribute up to the contribution limit, you must have enough earned income to cover the contribution you make. 

Employer Plans

Traditional and Roth IRAs are not the only plans with contribution limits. Self-employment plans are also subject to potential income changes. Retirement accounts such as the SEP IRA, SIMPLE IRA, and Solo 401(k) contribution limits were also reviewed for 2021. 

For SEP IRAs, the IRS increased the limit from $57,000 in 2020 to $58,000 for 2021. Like the SEP IRA, Solo 401(k)s followed the same pattern. The Solo 401(k) salary deferral amount stayed the same at $19,500 but the defined contribution maximum limit increased from $57,000 to $58,000, with an additional $6,500 catch-up contribution ($64,500 total) for those 50 or older. 

The Savings Incentive Match Plan for Employees, also known as the SIMPLE IRA, is the final employer plan offered at Quest. This account, often used by small businesses, did not see a change for 2021. The contribution limits for SIMPLE IRAs remained the same for 2021, which means employees under 50 can contribute up to $13,500, while those 50 and over get a $3,000 catch-up ($16,500 total). 

SIMPLE plans typically require the employer to match each employee’s salary reduction contributions on a dollar-for-dollar basis up to 3% of the employee’s compensation, also. For more information about employer matching contributions and any 2021 changes, visit the IRS website on SIMPLE IRAs. 

Special Plans

Health Savings Accounts (HSAs) and Coverdell Education Savings Accounts (ESAs) are the two final tax-advantaged accounts that Quest offers, both which follow the IRS contribution rules and guidelines. For these accounts, when you take the funds out for qualified medical or educational expenses, the distributions are tax-free! So, how much can you put contribute to them in 2021?

The annual limit on HSA contributions for 2021 saw a minimal increase. It will be $3,600 for self-only and $7,200 for family coverage, which comes out to be right around a 1.5% increase from limit in 2020. For those over the age of 55 or older, there is an additional $1,000 that can be contributed to the account. 

Minimum deductibles for HSAs saw no change for 2021, yet maximum out-of-pocket amounts did increase by $100 for individuals with self-coverage. It increased by $200 for those who have family coverage.

Lastly, the Coverdell ESA has a contribution limit of $2,000 per year per child. This means, each child in one household could each receive a $2,000 contribution to their ESA per year. There was no change from 2020 to 2021. 

Key Takeaways

Although each plan works a little bit different, the existence of a contribution limit remains a similarity. Understanding contribution limits will not only allow you to maximize your retirement account each year, it will also help you grow you future wealth faster! For more contribution questions, check out the helpful chart below or call an IRA Specialist at 855-FUN-IRAs (386.4727) and start preparing for your 2021 contributions!  

2021 IRA Contribution Limits

Quest Against the Rest: A Self-Directed IRA Custodian Comparison

When choosing to open your self-directed IRA, there will be many things to consider before selecting the best custodian. Alongside service and experience, one of the main considerations will most likely be the fees. Some custodians boast minimal fees, and although that may seem enticing at first, this usually comes with a less positive overall experience. 

Our mission at Quest Trust Company has always been to provide the best experience for our clients and the highest quality of customer service, or as we like to call it “world famous customer service.” At Quest, we make sure our clients’ needs are always at the forefront of every choice we make, from day to day decisions to companywide implementations like systems and procedures. 

So, how do those fees compare to other Self-Directed IRA custodians?

Quest Fees Compared to Others

Our rates remain competitive compared to other self-directed IRA providers. While their administrative fees may appear lower, transaction and miscellaneous fees may be substantially higher. Additionally, services like closing an account, 24-48 hour turn-around time, or doing Roth conversions remain free at Quest when other companies charge hidden fees for similar accounts tasks. 

Quest Trust Company: 3 Administrative Fee Options, NO Account Termination Fee, 24-48 hour funding time with NO Expedited Fees, NO Minimum Cash Balance Required, NO charge on incoming wires/checks and more!

Quest was determined to rank in the top half compared to other custodians, taking the spot of 3rd place overall when compared to 12 others. The level of customer service received when you have an account at Quest surpasses that of custodians with cheaper fees, allowing us to still be one of the custodians to provide the best value!

Education to Set Us Apart

While other custodians may be able to provide the ability to self-direct your IRA, not every custodian will provide quality education to help the client make the best investment decisions. Quincy Long, our CEO, has always said, “the best clients are the most educated clients,” and this is why we have always provided the free, quality educational material to our clients and to the public. 

We also believe the same holds true with our staff. At Quest, we believe that an educated and qualified staff is necessary in order to provide the level of service our clients deserve and set us apart from other custodians, regardless of fees.  

Features with your Quest Accounts

Quest is always working to enhance the education programs we have in place, but also develop new training programs centered on providing better and faster service. Continuous advances to our systems allow Quest to be one of the self-directed IRA custodians on the forefront of investing technology. Whether we are giving clients more access to take control of their investment all throughout the process in the improved Client Portal or implementing new features, we’re focused on being able to put the control in the hands of the client.

Fees will always be a consideration when choosing to open a self-directed IRA, but remember- cheaper isn’t always better. We hope that our clients continue to find our services valuable as we strive to be the best Self-Directed IRA custodian in helping new and old investors to create their wealth for tomorrow!

We would love to share the many benefits of being with Quest Trust Company. To get more free education or information about starting your self-directed IRA, give a friendly Quest Certified IRA Specialist a call at 855-FUN-IRAS (855.386.4727) or click here to schedule a complimentary consultation!

Can I Move My 401k Into a Self Directed IRA?

Did you know 45% of Americans fear they will run out of money during retirement?

If you have started taking more steps towards planning for retirement, then you are already ahead of the game. Those who want to be more in control of their money typically like to explore the options available, like a self-directed IRA.

What Is a Self-Directed IRA?

In short, a self-directed IRA has many similarities with other traditional IRAs. With a self-directed IRA, you can get tax advantages that will help you save for retirement. 

However, it’s essential to keep in mind the IRS will limit the types of investments you make. The IRS will allow your self-directed IRA to make investments in real estate, developmental land, mineral rights, cryptocurrency, and livestock. 

How Does a Self-Directed IRA Work?

If you plan to switch to a self-directed IRA, the first step is to pick a custodian from a brokerage or investment firm. The custodian’s job is to manage the IRA assets and coordinate the sale and purchase of the investments. 

Keep in mind the same rules of a traditional IRA apply to self-directed IRAs. For 2020, the maximum IRA contribution is capped at $6,000. However, those over the age of 50 can make an additional contribution of $1000 to catch up. 

Who Should Switch to a Self-Directed IRA?

If you’re wondering about switching to a self-directed IRA, it’s important to learn if it’s the right move for you. Those who decide to switch to a self-directed IRA do it for several reasons. 

You want to diversify your portfolio and plan to split your savings between a conventional IRA and a self-directed IRA.

You’re worried about your retirement investments after the 2008 financial crisis and want a safer investment. 

You’re an experienced investor in a specific type of investment, such as real estate. 

How to Set Up a Self-Directed IRA?

To qualify to set up a self-directed IRA, you need to fulfill specific requirements. For starters, you need to prove you earned taxable income during the current financial year. 

Some employers might offer their employees the option of enrolling in a self-directed IRA.

To set up a self-directed IRA, you can start by requesting the transferring of funds from the traditional IRA to the new one. Some people choose to transfer any profits they make into a self-directed IRA. Another way to do it is by deferring income directly to the account.

Can You Move Your Managed 401k?

The short answer is yes. However, you need to consider if it’s the right move for you. Remember to learn how a self-directed IRA works, who can benefit from one, and all pertinent details. 

A self-directed IRA could be a great move for you. Contact a Quest Trust Company IRA specialist today for a consultation.

How to roll over your 401k plan into a Self Directed IRA

If there is one thing that 2020 has taught us, it is that nothing is as certain as it was before.  One of the biggest fears for many Americans right now is their job security.  Many people have already lost their jobs and are wondering what comes next for them.  A major effect of leaving a job, whether it be through retirement, layoffs or simply moving to a new company, is that your 401(k) from your previous employer becomes eligible to be rolled over to an IRA.  

There are a variety of different options that become available to you with your previous employer 401(k) and we have listed the 3 most common options:

1) Moving the funds into an IRA 

If you were a part of a 401(k) plan at your previous employer, one of the most common options available to you on what to do with the funds is being able to move the funds into an IRA at a new custodian. When you leave your job, you have the ability to continue investing those funds on your own in an IRA or Self-Directed IRA, and when moving those funds to another qualified retirement account, you don’t experience any tax hits. 

One thing you would want to consider is what type of investment you plan on doing because this will help you determine the perfect custodian for your needs. Some Americans choose to put their money in a regular IRA and hand their money to a financial advisor at a public custodian to make all the decisions about their account for them. Others choose to take control and invest with a Self-Directed IRA at a non-traditional custodian that will hold private assets. 

You may be thinking about what the difference is between those two types of IRAs. A Self-Directed IRA is simply an IRA in which the IRA owner directs all investments in the account. There is no legal distinction between a “Self-Directed IRA” and any other IRA except with a truly self-directed IRA the account agreement allows the broadest possible spectrum of investments, which could include real estate and private or start-up companies. Understanding the difference between these two accounts shows that there are many options available just within the first category!

A great reason why many people choose to move their funds to an IRA rather than pulling out their 401(k) money is the magic of compound interest when you continue to reinvest. To put it simply, compound interest is “interest on interest”. It may be easy to think that taking a distribution from your retirement account is a quick way to get a big portion of money, and although you may not be wrong, the amount of money you COULD have if you left it inside of your account is exponential. When you take a distribution, your IRA is no longer growing, but when you continue to do deals inside of your account and reinvest those funds, your self-directed IRA is still making money for you. 

The most important part about moving your funds to another custodian is making sure you find your fit. Not all custodians focus on the same thing. Where some custodians like Quest have a focus in free, expedited funding times and IRA education, others boast flashy software or new automated phone lines. Being comfortable with your custodian will make you more comfortable and confident as you take the next step for your financial future. 

2) Leave the funds in a 401(k) 

If the thought of dealing with your 401k is too overwhelming, you may have the option to leave the funds in a 401(k), whether that be with the employer you just left or with your new job. Some employers allow you to keep your plan with them even if you no longer work for them. Even though you’re unable to contribute to the account, your money can still be invested and grow tax-deferred, but contacting the HR department of your previous employer to learn more about the restrictions and opportunities your plan has is recommended. You may also have the option to take your 401(k) plan with you to a new job if you find one.

3) Take a distribution 

During this time, if you need funds to help cover costs like a mortgage payment and immediate expenses, you may be considering taking money from a 401k account. Using 401k funds now to pay for expenses could mean that later when facing retirement, you don’t have that same amount available. The funds in the account also won’t be given a chance to grow during the next decades to build up for your future retirement.

Usually, taking money from your 401k leads to penalties and taxes, but the good news is that the recently passed CARES Act may help with some of these costs. Before the act, rules stated that those who were not 55 years old yet would face a 10% penalty on the amount taken out of a 401k after being relieved from/leaving your job. The CARES Act addresses the COVID-19 crisis and offers temporary adjustments to 401k withdrawals. This allows withdrawals up to $100,000 from your 401k account without paying the 10% penalty provided your distribution meets the criteria. The CARES Act also allows you to spread out the taxes on the withdrawal over the next three years. If the money is paid back within three years, you can avoid being taxed on the distribution that was taken out. This could be a good option for those who need money now.

Being aware that there are many different options, especially with a Self-Directed IRA, may be able to provide some peace of mind in knowing that not all is lost and that you can take control. If you need an IRA specialist, at Quest we are here to provide education no matter what option sounds the best for you. With our weekly webinars featuring investing education or our certified IRA specialist just a call away, rest assured knowing that your money is safe!

Know the Difference: IRA Transfer vs. Rollover

In order to live comfortably during retirement, you’ll need to start saving as soon as you can. Opening an IRA account is widely known as one of the most reliable ways to invest in your future.

There are two major ways to fund your IRA: transfers and rollovers.

Not everyone understands the difference between the two, though. Not sure where to start? Don’t worry, we’ve got you covered.

Let’s take a look at everything you need to know about IRA transfer vs rollover.

An IRA Transfer

When you move money from one IRA account to another, it’s known as a transfer. The same concept applies as when you move money between two separate checking accounts at different banks.

When you move funds from an IRA at one firm to an IRA account managed by another firm, the transfer isn’t reported to the IRS and no taxes are incurred. This is due to the fact that the money in the original IRA account never actually reached the account owner.

If the owner were to instead withdraw the funds and then reinvest them into another account, they would incur taxes upon withdrawal. There may even be tax penalties depending on why the money was taken out of the account.

An IRA Rollover

A rollover occurs when money is either moved from an IRA account to a retirement plan or from a retirement plan to an IRA account. When the money never reaches the account holder, it’s known as a direct rollover.

This type of rollover differs from a conventional transfer because it involves two different types of plans.

Although direct rollovers are reported to the IRS, they generally aren’t taxable since the money was never made payable to the account holder.

During an indirect rollover, the money is distributed to the account holder. But, it isn’t taxed if the money is reinvested in an IRA account within 60 days. This will allow the account funds to remain tax-deferred.

How Should I Prepare For One?

Above all else, it’s important to understand that a rollover will likely take a couple of weeks to complete. This is crucial for those handling indirect rollovers to keep in mind, as penalties occur after 60 days from when the funds are distributed to the account holder.

Additionally, most institutions will require you to fill out paperwork in order to begin the process. Some providers may have specific requirements regarding rollovers that may become a factor when reallocating your funds.

Knowing The Difference Between IRA Transfer Vs Rollover Can Seem Difficult

But it doesn’t have to be.

With the above information about an IRA transfer vs rollover in mind, you’ll be well on your way toward putting money away toward a peaceful retirement.

Want to learn more about how we can help? Feel free to get in touch with us today to see what we can do.

What is a Self-Directed IRA?

Whether it’s a Traditional IRA or a Roth IRA, a Self-Directed IRA (SDIRA), gives you all the tax advantages of an IRA with the freedom and flexibility of a wider array of investment instruments. The opportunity to take control of your financial future with greater asset diversification is one reason to invest in a self-directed IRA.

  • Regular IRAs allow investments in stocks, bonds, mutual funds, ETFs, and CDs. 
  • With a self-directed IRA, your investment options increase to include real estate, tax lien certificates, private market securities, promissory notes, and other investment opportunities. 
  • Building wealth with the tax advantages of an IRA while diversifying your retirement investment fund allows you to seek higher returns than a regular IRA. 
  • Higher yields and less volatility are another advantage of an SDIRA.

There are restrictions on what is permissible within IRS guidelines for an SDIRA. 

  • For example, you cannot borrow money from your SDIRA, sell the property to it, or enter into deals with relatives for it. 
  • You should also know that your IRA custodian cannot provide investment advice. 
  • Your IRA custodian can and should advise you of all prohibited transactions for your SDIRA.

The annual contribution limits are the same as a regular IRA: for those below the age of 50, $6000, and those older than 50, $7000. With the current and future problems with pensions, health care, Social Security, and other government programs, it is more important than ever to have a solid foundation for your financial future.

Quest Trust Company IRA Specialists can answer your questions about an SDIRA. Consider the benefits of an SDIRA with Quest Trust Company as your custodian: 

  • While most companies have only one option for your SDIRA, Quest Trust Company offers seven. 
  • Quest, there is no minimum cash balance. 
  • Transaction processing can exceed over two weeks with some companies; Quest processes transactions within 24-48 hours.

Quest offers the following for FREE (Other companies charge a fee for all of the following items):

  1. Expedited Services
  2. Processing Incoming Wires
  3. Processing Incoming Checks
  4. Roth Conversions
  5. Re-Characterizations
  6. Change Account Type Fee
  7. Certified Mail Fee
  8. Paper Statement Fee
  9. Distribution Processing
  10. Required Minimum Cash Balance (No minimum cash balance)

Contact a Quest IRA Specialist today! And discover how a self-directed IRA will fit into your retirement investment strategy. At Quest Trust Company, we help you take control of your retirement. 

Self-Directed IRAs and the American Dream

If you asked a group of people what the American Dream was, you would probably receive a different answer from each person. However, the responses would probably revolve around the central themes of having enough resources to cut down on everyday stresses and/or having a family to share life with. What attracts much of the world’s immigrants to the United States is the hope of success and prosperity, or just the opportunity to increase the quality of one’s life. While some people get lucky and are born into success or were born at the right time to have economical success come a little easier, success and prosperity are mostly gained through working hard and using your resources wisely.

It’s pretty clear that how one goes about achieving the American Dream is far different than it was 50 years ago, or even 30 years ago. A college degree isn’t a guarantee for getting a better job, and even the housing market is prone to major crashes, as we all witnessed in 2008. While we could debate for years over what the best strategies are for success, what we do know is that generations entering the work force now are having to be much more adaptable and innovative to make the American Dream into their reality. Many of these young workers are disillusioned with traditional 9-5 company jobs and are turning toward entrepreneurship.

We have all heard of the phrase “It takes money to make money,” and for the large part, you will need some resources to launch a business of your own. Utilizing Self-Directed IRAs is one way to gather the required resources. Unlike conventional IRAs, which limit the kinds of investments investors can make, Self-Directed IRAs open up the possibilities of investment to nearly anything, including your small start-up. Self-Directed IRAs call these “private placements”, and some entrepreneurs rely on investors to invest on them through this avenue.

Keep in mind, you can’t invest your own retirement funds into your business idea, and neither can your family or close friends. However, a handful of smart investors who see value in your idea might just provide you with the funds necessary to see it come to life. Usually investors are keenly aware that Self-Directed IRAs are inherently riskier than the safer stocks, bonds, and mutual funds they are used to. However, they also understand that with greater risk often comes greater reward.

Investors in Self-Directed IRAs like to stick with what they know or in a single industry in order to stay well updated on trends and news. They will likely vet potential investment opportunities before putting their money anywhere, and the process can sometimes take months of intense study. After all, not only are business owners relying on investors for launch money, but the investors are relying on the business for retirement money. In the right situation, investments in Self-Directed IRAs can turn out to be a win-win for everyone where all players get the sweet satisfaction of the American Dream in the end.

What’s Changing with Self Directed IRAs?

While the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act threatened to make big changes with regard to retirement accounts, there were only a few small changes that actually made the final cut. Most of the investment rules and penalties stayed the same for the 2018 year. The changes that were made dealt with recharacterization rules, Roth account income limits, 401(k) contribution limits, Saver’s Credit income limits, and uses for 529 accounts.

Roth Recharacterizations

The biggest change in the Act was the limiting of plan recharacterizations. In the past, plan owners could convert their Traditional IRA to a Roth IRA as long as they qualified, and then revert back before the end of the year if they changed their mind. Sometimes assets lost value or the tax burden for the conversion ended up too much for the owner to bear, so they would convert their accounts back before the effects took place.

Plan owners will no longer be able to take advantage of this loophole starting with any Roth conversions made on or after January 1, 2018. For conversions that occurred prior to that date, plan owners may choose to recharacterize them back to a Traditional IRA on or before October 15, 2018.

Income Limits for Roth IRA

Income limits for Roth IRAs raised slightly for the 2018 year. New contribution limits are as follows:

To contribute toward a Roth IRA, you must earn less than the maximum income limit for your category. Single filers must earn below $135,000 to qualify, and maximum contribution levels phase out starting at $120,000 (these limits increased by $2,000). Couples filing jointly must earn less than $199,000 to qualify, and their maximum contribution amounts start phasing out at $189,000 (these limits increased by $3,000). Married filing separately must earn less than $10,000 to contribute anything, although phase out starts at $1 (there was no change in these limits).

Plan Contribution Limits

Annual contribution limits for 401(k), 403(b), and 457 plans increased by $500 for the 2018 year. So, savers can contribute up to $18,500 or $24,500 if they are 50-years-old or older. For Traditional and Roth IRAs, contribution limits stayed the same at $5,500 per year, or $6,500 for those 50 or older.

Saver’s Credit Income Limits

The Saver’s Credit applies to Traditional IRA contributions for savers earning less than the income limits imposed. You may claim a tax deduction on these contributions if you earned less than $73,000 as a single person (starts to phase out at $63,000), $121,000 for married couples filing jointly where the IRA contributor is covered by a work-related plan (starts to phase out at $101,000), $199,000 for married couples filing jointly where the IRA contributor is not covered by a work-related plan but the spouse is (starts to phase out at $189,000), or $10,000 for married taxpayer filing separately and covered by a work-related plan (starts to phase out at $1). You can also learn more about Bitcoin IRA Rollover at this website.

New Uses for 529 Plans

Parents and grandparents will be pleased that 529 plan funds, which traditionally have been set aside for college expenses, can now be used for K-12 expenses related to private, public, or religious schooling. There is a caveat, however. Plan owners can only use these funds for up to $10,000 in school-related expenses per year. Note that Coverdell ESAs had always allowed plan owners to use funds for K-12 schooling and there are no withdrawal limits. There are many more differences between 529s and Coverdell ESAs, however, so study these thoroughly before deciding on one or the other.

Self-Directed IRAs: Three Things You Should Know

Self-directed IRAs are just what they sound like—IRAs that you call all of the shots for. These accounts allow for investments with larger rewards, but you will only reap them if you know what you are doing. Self-directed IRAs are inherently riskier than accounts controlled by a plan manager. Since you are the one choosing the investments, not just picking from a list, you will need to contribute research and prior knowledge into the process in order to play smart. Read on to learn more about what you should know about Self-Directed IRAs before starting one of your own.

Knowledge is Power

Most people who utilize Self-Directed IRAs stick with what they know. If they have a background in technology, or know a lot about real estate, they can make wise choices with those investments. Gathering as much information as possible, keeping up on the latest news in the industry, and checking projections are all ways to make the most of your investments. Remember, there are some restrictions for Self-Directed IRAs that can cost you in penalties. Avoid these at all costs.

Going into an investment blind could end up costing you big time, and you don’t want to be too risky with your retirement! However, the bigger the risk, the bigger the reward most of the time. Just keep in mind, there’s risk and then there’s calculated risk. Stay on the calculated side to avoid big blunders.

One Misstep Can Cost You Thousands

Not only do you have to be aware of the risk and rewards of each investment, but you also need to understand the total price as well. Some investments carry with them an added tax burden that investors should calculate into the total cost of the investment before purchasing. Just because these investments do have tax consequences doesn’t mean you should automatically write them off, however. The rewards for some outweigh the costs, but it’s important to at least be aware of them before you get yourself into a situation you weren’t prepared for. Typically, Self-Directed IRAs have lower management costs, so don’t forget to calculate in that piece as well.

Investment Opportunities are Abundant

Most retirement accounts have a list of investments that plan owners can choose from. Sometimes these options are just what you are looking for, and other times not so much. Self-Directed IRAs offer more room for experimentation and opportunities. If you have kept up-to-date on trends in your industry and see an opportunity that could pay off big time, a Self-Directed IRA is one way to make that happen. You can also invest in real estate, gold, private businesses, and tax liens with a Self-Directed IRA, which you can’t do with typical IRAs. However, like with conventional IRA accounts, you can choose between Traditional, Roth, SEP, SIMPLE, Individual 401(k), etc. for your plan type.

If you would like to diversify your portfolio or invest in something specific, you can use a Self-Directed IRA to accomplish your goals. As long as you understand the investment and calculate your risk, these types of investments can pay off handsomely.