Required Minimum Distributions

  • What’s in a Name? – Why It’s Important to Name a Beneficiary for Your IRA

    Many people probably don’t think too much about how important it is to name a beneficiary for their IRAs.  However, as my family recently found out, ignoring this important detail when setting up your IRA can be costly from a tax perspective. I recently received a distribution check from an IRA of my father, who passed away last year.  My father was a very careful planner, so I was quite shocked at his lack of tax planning with his IRA.  When setting up his IRA he named his estate as the beneficiary of the IRA (this is equivalent to not naming a beneficiary at all).  This meant that when he passed away the estate had to be probated, even though the IRAs were the only assets requiring probate in his estate.  IRAs that have named beneficiaries are generally non-probate assets, meaning that they pass directly to the beneficiaries instead of passing through a will.  That was the first problem. The larger problem came because of the lack of choices he left us by naming his estate as beneficiary.  In a Traditional IRA, required minimum distributions must begin no later than April 1 of the year after the IRA owner turns age 70 ...

  • How a Change of Career Can Impact Your Self-Directed IRA

    The process of building up a retirement nest egg doesn’t occur in a vacuum. You can come up with a savings plan and investment plan, but if the other financial elements of your life undergo significant changes, you might have to adjust those plans. One thing that can impact your self-directed IRA in several important ways is changing your job or career. New Income Levels As you are likely already aware, your ability to contribute to a traditional self-directed IRA or a Roth self-directed will depend on your modified adjusted gross income, as well as whether you’re participating in an employer-sponsored retirement plan such as a 401(k). For 2014, for example, if you’re a single taxpayer and you’re covered by a retirement plan at work, you can only deduct the full amount of any contributions you make to a traditional self-directed IRA if your modified gross income is $60,000 or less. If you’re not covered by a retirement plan at work then your contributions to a traditional self-directed IRA will be fully deductible regardless of your income. With respect to a Roth self-directed IRA it is irrelevant whether or not you participate in an employer-sponsored retirement plan, but you can only make the ...

  • Steps For Rolling Over Existing Accounts Into A Self-Directed IRA

    As people work their way through one or more careers, and have several (if not dozens) of jobs, they can easily accumulate multiple retirement accounts. They generally come in the form of 401(k) accounts at past employers, traditional IRAs, Roth IRAs, and perhaps even employer pension plans (although this last type of benefit is becoming increasingly rare). Unfortunately, it can often become quite an administrative burden to manage so many different accounts. For some individuals it can be challenging enough trying to come up with the time to review the monthly or quarterly statements from a single retirement account. Trying to do so for a half-dozen or more accounts can quickly become nearly impossible. The best way to clear up this administrative nightmare is to roll over all of your existing accounts, including accounts from prior employers, into a single self-directed IRA. Here are the steps for doing so. 1. Identify Your Target Account. If you don’t currently have a self-directed IRA, then you’ll need to set one up before you go any further. Requesting a rollover from a prior 401(k) or a current IRA, but not having a target account in place, can result in the other plan administrator sending you a check for ...

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