Can You Deduct Your Self-Directed IRA Contributions Deductible In 2015?

Being able to deduct your self-directed IRA contributions from your tax return can be a great incentive for you to maximize those contributions each year. But not all IRA contributions are deductible.

Roth vs. Traditional Self-Directed IRA. The first consideration in determining whether you can deduct your 2015 contributions to your self-directed IRA is whether your account is set up as a Roth account or as a traditional account. Contributions to Roth accounts are never deductible, and contributions to traditional IRAs are sometimes deductible. Let’s examine the circumstances under which contributions to your traditional self-directed IRA can be deducted on your 2015 tax return.

You Aren’t Covered By an Employer Sponsored Retirement Plan. If you don’t participate in an employer retirement plan (such as a 401(k) plan, profit-sharing plan, SEP, SIMPLE-IRA or certain defined benefits plans that you participate in), then your contributions to your self-directed IRA will be fully deductible, regardless of your income, if either (a) your tax filing status is single or (b) you file a joint return with your spouse but your spouse is not covered by a retirement plan at their employer.

If you file a joint return but your spouse is covered by a retirement plan at their job, then you’ll be able to deduct the full value of your contribution if your joint income is $183,000 or less. You can take a partial deduction if your joint income is between $183,000 and $193,000, and no deduction is available if your joint income is $193,000 or more. For purposes of these income thresholds, it’s not your gross income, but your Modified Adjusted Gross Income (“MAGI”) that’s relevant.

You Are Covered by an Employer Sponsored Retirement Plan. If you are covered by a retirement plan at work, then your ability to deduct your self-directed IRA contribution will again depend upon your MAGI and your filing status.

If you file a single tax return, then you’ll be eligible for a full deduction if your MAGI in 2015 is$61,000 or less. You can take a partial deduction for an MAGI between $61,000 and $71,000, but no tax deduction for your contributions if your MAGI is $71,000 or greater.

If you’re married and file a joint return, then you can take a full deduction for your contribution if your joint MAGI is $98,000 or less, or a partial deduction if your joint MAGI is between $98,000 and $118,000. Your deduction will not be deductible if your joint MAGI is $118,000 or more.

While being able to get a current year tax deduction for contributions to a traditional self-directed IRA can be valuable, even non-deductible contributions (such as to a Roth self-directed IRA or to a traditional account in years where your MAGI is too high) can be extremely valuable to your retirement future. The ability for your investments to grow in a self-directed IRA for years or decades on a tax-deferred or tax-free basis is something you shouldn’t pass up.

 

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